Have you upgraded to Windows 10 v1903 or v1909

Have you noticed any major [feature] update in the last little while? It is the one that can take 45+ minutes to do.

If not, you need to check to make sure you have either 1903 or 1909 installed on your Windows 10 computer. To do this:

  1. Open “Settings” or “PC Settings” [this will depends on what menu you see].
  2. Click on “System” [it’s always in the upper left corner of the 10+ icons in the window].
  3. On the left side scroll down and click on “About”.
  4. On the right side scroll down until you see “Windows specifications”.
  5. Ignoring the other details, you must see version 1903 or 1909.

If you are at 1809 or prior, it may be because your Anti-virus version may be too old/out-dated. Microsoft is stopping any Windows 10 computer from getting the latest version until the Anti-virus is updated correctly.

In addition, if you are at 1803 and before, you will not get any further updates to Windows [including the monthly ones] until you upgrade to 1903 or 1909.

You can run the Upgrade Assistant to check if you computer is compatible or to upgrade. There are some older processors which may have been compatible with older versions of Windows 10 but not the latest.

PS – 1903 and 1909 are almost identical. Either version is OK to be on.

Success! Upgraded to Windows 10 v1903

So a month or so ago I tried to upgrade to Windows 10 v1903 [19H1] from v1809.

If you remember [or not!] the history of my prime computer, I had tried to upgrade from v1709 to v1803 but it failed. Too many weird things such as certain options I could not change and I had issues with my audio card.

As I have Windows 10 Pro, I can delay these feature upgrades for up to a year – which I did. I skipped v1803 and upgraded from v1709 to v1809.

Over time, I also noticed that I was getting some issues with my sound card.

So after upgrading from v1809 to v1903 failed earlier this summer, I decided to “modernize” my sound card. It wasn’t the latest sound card but still newer than my old one – which was around 10 years old.

Yesterday, I upgraded to v1903 successfully. Seemed to take a bit longer than previously but I don’t see any issues. And for once, after upgrading, I didn’t have to spend time fixing the settings.

I tend to upgrade with the media, instead of waiting for Windows [or Microsoft] to notify me. So I go through the process of checking for updates and what to keep [among other stuff].

What I found interesting is that after it checked for updates, all it installed was the latest cumulative update for Windows 10 v1903.

What it didn’t include was a servicing stack update [KB4515530], a microcode update [KB4497165], and a .net Framework update [KB451155]. So why weren’t those included while checking for updates?

One reason why getting v1903 onto my system is that when v1909 [1`9H2] comes out at the end of this month or early next month [assuming no major issues again!]. v1909 will be not a feature update but a huge update [can you call it a service pack?] that will installed like a typical monthly update. But v1903 will be required for the v1909 update.

Note that Microsoft is expected to have a regular full installation for any system that isn’t at v1903 but want to go to v1909 directly.

Microsoft to push Spring 2019 Windows 10 update

Because of the more than expected amount of Windows 10 users are still using the v1803 release [which will have support ending this fall], Microsoft has decided to push out the v1903 [the latest Windows 10 release] earlier than usual.

You will have the option to delay the v1903 upgrade release for up to 35 days so you can do the upgrade at your convenience. Depending on your computer, this upgrade could last from about an hour [for faster computers] to over 2 hours [for slower computers].

This needs to be done soon – otherwise you will not receive any further security updates and enhancements.

Microsoft change feature updates frequency for “home” Windows 10 users

Microsoft has announced changes to how Windows 10 get feature updates [that is/was the big one roughly every 6 months – assuming no issues]. For OEM and retail Windows 10 editions [think the “Home” version], feature update installations are no longer mandatory. Instead, the feature update is offered as an optional update. The PC’s owner has to approve of the installation manually. You’re free to ignore that prompt for as long as the current version is supported, or a maximum of 18 months.

For Pro, Education, and Enterprise editions, it is the status quo.

Windows 10 warns about updating to the May 2019 update

I guess depending on the version you use [I’m using Pro with a feature update delay] you may or may not see the message below when you should update to the Windows 10 May 2019 Update.

Obviously you probably shouldn’t install the May update through other means [MediaTool, ISO] if it’s giving you this warning.

BTW, I wish Microsoft would get their version format settled. Is it v1903 or 19H1? Is it v1909 [seen in the Windows Insiders] or 19H2?

Microsoft to force feature updates on near out of support Windows 10 installations

Microsoft announced this week that for Windows 10 devices that are at, or within several months of reaching end of service, Windows Update will automatically initiate a feature update…. The Windows 10 April 2018 Update (Windows 10, version 1803) will reach end of service on November 12, 2019 for Home and Pro editions.

Starting this June [2019], Microsoft will begin updating devices running the April 2018 Update and earlier versions of Windows 10.

[Ed’s comments: Expect a flood of complainers/whiners plus some butchered installations.]

Windows 10 19H1 finally released

Very [almost] quietly, Microsoft finally has released Windows 10 19H1 [a.k.a. v1903]. It is based on build 18362.30 – although there are already up to 18362.116.

By the old title [“v1903”], this was to be released in March or early April. We are in the last full week of May. They were obviously some issues but they didn’t want the fiasco of v1809 which was released in November 2018.

v1809 release only managed to pick up around 30% of the Windows 10 users. Many holding out and hoping for a stable 19H1.

The next feature release is expected sometime in the second half of 2019 but is expected to be more like a traditional “service pack” – mostly fixes and corrections and less of new or updated features.

As usual, consumers will probably get notification with the best likely systems [newest usually] to be offered it first.

ISO images are available from the usual sources as well as the Media Tool creation tool is available from Microsoft.