How to restore an uninstalled an app that came with Windows 10

It comes the time where you have uninstalled an app that came with Windows 10 but now you want it back. The following procedure usually works.

Note: Sorry. I am not a PowerShell expert. If you get an error or doesn’t restore, I can’t help you.

Open Notepad or your favorite text editor. You will use this to build your restore line.

Add the following line at the top:

Add-AppxPackage -register "C:\Program Files\WindowsApps\XXX\AppxManifest.xml" –DisableDevelopmentMode

Find “PowerShell” in the Start Menu.

Note: Not the ones with “ISE” or “(x86)” in it unless you are using the 32-bit version of Windows.

Right click on it, and run as Administrator.

You will need to approve the User Account Control.

First thing to do is get a list of apps by issuing the following command which will list all available apps:

Get-Appxpackage –Allusers

Say you uninstalled Windows Store and want it back, you need to scroll and find the group of lines that include WindowsStore in it [no space in it]. Across from PackageFullName in that group of lines will be a semi cryptic text.

You need to copy that line [unless you want to type it!]. To do so, highlight the first character in “Microsoft” and keep on left clicking until you reach the end of the line. Press Ctrl-C to copy what you highlighted. The highlighting disappears.

Go into Notepad [or equivalent]. Replace the XXX in the line that you added in there with text you copied.

With v1607 on a 64-bit system, it should look something like [may not be exactly]:

Add-AppxPackage -register "C:\Program Files\WindowsApps\Microsoft.WindowsStore_11610.1001.23.0_x64__8wekyb3d8bbwe\AppxManifest.xml" –DisableDevelopmentMode

Copy the full line in the text editor. Go back into the PowerShell window and paste what you copied by right clicking on a blank line. It should paste. Hit the Enter key. If you get no red text, it should be restored.

Note: Don’t ask me why but you never see a “Command completed successfully” or equivalent. You have to assume it was successful if no red text.

Note: In the case of Windows Store it is listed in the Start Menu as “Store”.

 

Warning before installing Windows 10 Creators Update

Microsoft have issued a warning for those thinking of manually upgrading Windows 10 to the Creators Update [a.k.a. v1703, a.k.a. Redstone 2, a.k.a. build 15063]: Don’t.

The big update has already run into problems with some types of Broadcom Bluetooth LE radios: the code was killing connections with accessories, apparently. So Microsoft stopped pushing automatic downloads to computers carrying that hardware. There may also be others hardware issues.

When an issue such as this happens, they issue a “block” which will stop the computer from getting the update. It doesn’t stop, however, a person from upgrading manually on their own with an ISO or other ways. Once the issue has been corrected, the block is removed.

That’s why Microsoft started with newer hardware first. It will give them time to correct the problem.

So far maybe 10 per cent of Windows machines are running the Creators Update. Microsoft’s own recent hardware are leading the pack in upgrades.

Unsure how they release CU with this issue – except maybe because they gave themselves a deadline. But this is v1703. At one point, it looked like it would be called v1704. An extra month [or at least a week or so] wouldn’t have caused these problems.

 

How to fix VMware Tools and black screens with Windows 10 Creator Update

At “press time”, Microsoft has announced that Windows 10 Creator Update [i.e. Redstone 2, a.k.a. build 15063, a.k.a. v1703] has been released. Those on the technical side probably know how to get it. For the rest, it will be on or after April 11th.

This article deals with VMware Workstation 11 [and probably older] as well as VMware Player. So most likely the audience are those who are technical.

If you are like me and are using an unsupported VMware Workstation or Player and get a black screen for the video [or at least that] after upgrading Windows 10 or installing VMware Tools in a fresh Windows 10 installation, the following may make Windows 10 Creator Edition [a.k.a. blah, blah, blah] run better with VMware Workstation or Player:

Go here and download either the ISO image or the applicable EXE for the architecture. You probably want the ISO as you may not be able to copy over the executable but you can attach the ISO. Tested with version 10.1.5 build 5055683.

What you are doing is installing the VMware Tools for the latest version of VMware Workstation 12.5. The video issue gets corrected. I am guessing you can install any VMware Tools for your product [and not VMware Tools for ESX].

I tested this on two VMs, one upgraded from v1607 to v1703 and a fresh installation of v1703 and both worked but I recommend removing the current VMware Tools first.

Prior to trying this, I would suggest you take a snapshot [applies to Workstation only] or back up your VM.

It’s official, Windows 10 v1703 out on April 11th

Microsoft has confirmed that Windows 10 Creator Edition [a.k.a. v1703, a.k.a. build 15063, a.k.a. Redstone 2] has been released and will be available through windows Update on April 11th.

Links to create ISOs or force installation will be available soon.

Microsoft already released a small update – already at build 15063.2.

 

Windows 10 v1703 goes RTM?

According to some reports, Windows 10 [a.k.a. v1703 (not v1704), a.k.a. Redstone 2, a.k.a. Creators Update] may have been RTMed [“release to manufacturing”] this past week with a rumored/leaked release date of April 11th – the same day the dreaded Vista gets its last updates and goes unsupported. Build number is 15063.

There are probably good indications of both as there hasn’t been any builds since 15063 was released over a week ago and Microsoft has started to release builds for “Redstone 3” [due on November].

In addition, “RTM” was mentioned in various XML files as part of the 15063 build.

As for the actual release date, Microsoft tends to prefer Patch Tuesdays. In addition a leaked and later pulled file mentioned April 11th.

Those part of the windows Insiders program [or have connections!] should be able to get the bits. Others will wait until they get notified sometime on or after April 11th.

Note that any systems upgraded to v1607 build within the past 30 days will not get the upgrade notice at least until after the 30 days are up.

Of course domain and enterprise level systems will not get the upgrade until the administrators approve.

 

How to reset Microsoft Edge in Windows 10

This blog page will show you how to reset Microsoft Edge to its defaults. Unlike Internet Explorer, Edge does not use Internet options in the Control Panel.

If you can access Edge while open:

  1. Press on the three dots near the upper right corner of Edge [I wish they would use the “hamburger” symbol, but I digress].
  2. Under “Clear browsing data”, select “Choose what to clear” and then select “Show more.” You are better off clearing everything if the issue is major. Click on them all and click “Clear.”
  3. Restart your computer and re-open Edge and everything should be as if you opened it for the first time.

If you can’t access Edge [i.e. got hit with malware and you believe it is just affecting Edge and nothing else], opening it won’t help:

You need to use an administrative tool called PowerShell.

Note: It is recommended that you create a System Restore point before continuing.

First, go to the following location and delete everything inside [replace myloginname with your actual login name]

C:\Users\myloginname\AppData\Local\Packages\Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe

Note: Don’t delete Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe, just the contents inside.

Right-click on the Start menu and choose “Windows PowerShell (Admin)”. If you can’t find it, it should be in the menu `as well.

Copy and paste the following at the prompt [on one line]:

Get-AppXPackage -AllUsers -Name Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge | Foreach {Add-AppxPackage -DisableDevelopmentMode -Register "$($_.InstallLocation)\AppXManifest.xml" -Verbose}

You should see three lines in yellow with the third line saying something like “VERBOSE: Operation completed”.

 

Some more information on what to expect with Windows 10

[The information below based on Insider Preview build 15042.]

As Microsoft works out the kinks in Windows 10 Creator Update [a.k.a. Redstone 2, a.k.a. v1704] in time for an expected April release [I am guessing somewhere around April 25th], Microsoft continues to test the Unified Update Platform [UUP].

UUP is similar to the windows update technology that is used for the current cumulative updates [where while the size of the update is (say) 1GB, it only download what it needs]. The same will apply for installing the Creator update from an earlier update. Instead of downloading 2.5GB to 3.5GB of binaries [many which haven’t changed since your current release], it will only download the installer portion plus what has changed. Microsoft estimates that it should be about one third of a full installation. So if you are updating a 64-bit Windows 10, it will need to grab maybe 1.2GB instead of 3.5GB.

Those who upgrade to the Creator Update get the technology immediately. Obviously if you buy a new computer with the Creator Update, it will be included for the next update [Redstone 3 or v1711].

Of course you can still download the ISO file to upgrade if you wish.

Microsoft has also made the Windows 10 installing experience a bit less business orientated and more casual. In addition to a voice guiding you through [which you can mute if you get annoyed], the way things are described on the screen are more like everyday usage.

Such as if you want to create a local account instead of a Microsoft account [which seems easier to find now], it asks you to “create a super memorable password” in big letters and a warning that there is no way to retrieve the password if lost [hah!].

Or during updates during the installation it will say “Don’t turn off your device, please! It will mess things up.”

Patch updating as changed. For “home” users, you can install and reboot right away, schedule a time within the next 3 days or snooze the alert for 3 days [you can’t snooze again]. Pro users as well as those on a domain will have other options. The “quiet” time for no updating has also increased from 12 hours to 18 hours.

Ed

PS – At this time, if you are running Windows 10 in VMware Workstation 11, it may crash after installing VMware Tools. So don’t. Windows 10 actually picks up sufficient drivers. The same for older version. No idea about VMware Workstation 12 or later.