Windows Vista [support] is dead…

Miss it yet?

For anyone still using it, there will be no further support. No updates. whatever is in Microsoft’s web site will be come static.

Most if not all software developers and those supporting peripherals [such as printers] have probably already stopped supporting Vista long ago.

If you still have it, good luck!

[Windows Server 2008 support ends in January 2020.]

 

How to fix VMware Tools and black screens with Windows 10 Creator Update

At “press time”, Microsoft has announced that Windows 10 Creator Update [i.e. Redstone 2, a.k.a. build 15063, a.k.a. v1703] has been released. Those on the technical side probably know how to get it. For the rest, it will be on or after April 11th.

This article deals with VMware Workstation 11 [and probably older] as well as VMware Player. So most likely the audience are those who are technical.

If you are like me and are using an unsupported VMware Workstation or Player and get a black screen for the video [or at least that] after upgrading Windows 10 or installing VMware Tools in a fresh Windows 10 installation, the following may make Windows 10 Creator Edition [a.k.a. blah, blah, blah] run better with VMware Workstation or Player:

Go here and download either the ISO image or the applicable EXE for the architecture. You probably want the ISO as you may not be able to copy over the executable but you can attach the ISO. Tested with version 10.1.5 build 5055683.

What you are doing is installing the VMware Tools for the latest version of VMware Workstation 12.5. The video issue gets corrected. I am guessing you can install any VMware Tools for your product [and not VMware Tools for ESX].

I tested this on two VMs, one upgraded from v1607 to v1703 and a fresh installation of v1703 and both worked but I recommend removing the current VMware Tools first.

Prior to trying this, I would suggest you take a snapshot [applies to Workstation only] or back up your VM.

It’s official, Windows 10 v1703 out on April 11th

Microsoft has confirmed that Windows 10 Creator Edition [a.k.a. v1703, a.k.a. build 15063, a.k.a. Redstone 2] has been released and will be available through windows Update on April 11th.

Links to create ISOs or force installation will be available soon.

Microsoft already released a small update – already at build 15063.2.

 

Windows 10 v1703 goes RTM?

According to some reports, Windows 10 [a.k.a. v1703 (not v1704), a.k.a. Redstone 2, a.k.a. Creators Update] may have been RTMed [“release to manufacturing”] this past week with a rumored/leaked release date of April 11th – the same day the dreaded Vista gets its last updates and goes unsupported. Build number is 15063.

There are probably good indications of both as there hasn’t been any builds since 15063 was released over a week ago and Microsoft has started to release builds for “Redstone 3” [due on November].

In addition, “RTM” was mentioned in various XML files as part of the 15063 build.

As for the actual release date, Microsoft tends to prefer Patch Tuesdays. In addition a leaked and later pulled file mentioned April 11th.

Those part of the windows Insiders program [or have connections!] should be able to get the bits. Others will wait until they get notified sometime on or after April 11th.

Note that any systems upgraded to v1607 build within the past 30 days will not get the upgrade notice at least until after the 30 days are up.

Of course domain and enterprise level systems will not get the upgrade until the administrators approve.

 

Privacy in technology

Even as we close in on 2 years of Windows 10, we still see so-called “journalists” [or bloggers] who continue to fan the flames when it comes to privacy/telemetry settings in Windows. zdnet.com had one this week.

Microsoft has tweaked the way the settings are over the 2 upgrades in Windows 10 plus they tweaked it again earlier this year [if you bought a new laptop and it had the update].

Even with the tweaking, there has been many third-party tools [such as Safer Networking] that can be used to disable some of this – aside from what Microsoft provides. Some inventive people even wrote scripts to remove some of it.

Note: Some tweaks can actually cause problems as well if you modify them.

And yet, these so-called “journalists” continue to write what is considered mostly a dead issue.

If you are still whining about this privacy/telemetry issue, then I’m not sure if you belong in IT [if you are in that field]. Whining does nothing.

Everything you touch has some privacy/telemetry issues. Your ISP tracks your Internet access. Your carrier tracks your cell usage. If you use a search engine, it’s tracked. You are using an operating system? No matter which one, they are all tracking you.

Question is that do you know how much tracking Google, Apple or others are doing?

Remember when Siri from Apple first came out? Apple stored what you asked [voice recording] plus all your metadata [Apple ID, date, time, IP, etc.] for at least 6 months. After 6 months, they still kept your voice sample [and probably a subset of the metadata] for another 2 years. Apple claimed it was because they needed sample voices to improve Siri’s understanding. You are still being tracked with Siri.

When you visit a web site [that you are registered on], ever get an Email following a visit asking you if you are still interest in what you were looking at or something similar?  Staples and Best Buy are among the numerous sites that do that.

So the first thing you do when buying something with an OS is to go into the setting thoroughly – every section – and disabled or modify what you don’t want. You then research to see what else can be disabled or modified.

The same goes for web sites that you visit. Go in and turn off or modify what you don’t need.

The other alternative is to dump anything that connects yourself to the internet, the Cloud, etc. [Not even a dumb cell phone.]

 

How to reset Microsoft Edge in Windows 10

This blog page will show you how to reset Microsoft Edge to its defaults. Unlike Internet Explorer, Edge does not use Internet options in the Control Panel.

If you can access Edge while open:

  1. Press on the three dots near the upper right corner of Edge [I wish they would use the “hamburger” symbol, but I digress].
  2. Under “Clear browsing data”, select “Choose what to clear” and then select “Show more.” You are better off clearing everything if the issue is major. Click on them all and click “Clear.”
  3. Restart your computer and re-open Edge and everything should be as if you opened it for the first time.

If you can’t access Edge [i.e. got hit with malware and you believe it is just affecting Edge and nothing else], opening it won’t help:

You need to use an administrative tool called PowerShell.

Note: It is recommended that you create a System Restore point before continuing.

First, go to the following location and delete everything inside [replace myloginname with your actual login name]

C:\Users\myloginname\AppData\Local\Packages\Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe

Note: Don’t delete Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe, just the contents inside.

Right-click on the Start menu and choose “Windows PowerShell (Admin)”. If you can’t find it, it should be in the menu `as well.

Copy and paste the following at the prompt [on one line]:

Get-AppXPackage -AllUsers -Name Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge | Foreach {Add-AppxPackage -DisableDevelopmentMode -Register "$($_.InstallLocation)\AppXManifest.xml" -Verbose}

You should see three lines in yellow with the third line saying something like “VERBOSE: Operation completed”.

 

Microsoft delays February patches until March

Microsoft has decided to delay the February patches until March – even though there is a possible critical vulnerability not addressed.

While not officially disclosed, some believe it is the “build” mechanism for the patching that is an issue and not a patch itself.

[Updated 2017/02/21:] Word went out that Microsoft would release the Flash Player update but as of “press” time, it hasn’t. The Malicious Software Removal Tool has been released though.

For those who want to at least be slightly more secure, Microsoft did release an interim update late January for v1607 which you can find it here [manual download and install]. There were no updates for the other editions of Windows 10 or older versions of Windows.