Issue with latest Windows 10 v1703 update

You may want to hold off on updating to the latest [patch Tuesday] monthly update released on October 10th if using the v1703 edition (Build 15063; “Creator Update”, Redstone 2) of Windows 10.

Systems with support enabled for USB Type-C Connector System Software Interface (UCSI) may experience a blue screen or stop responding with a black screen when a system shutdown is initiated.

Microsoft has yet to release a fix but the temporary solution is to disable UCSI in the computer system’s BIOS. This will also disable UCSI features in the Windows operating system.

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2 Windows 10 v1709 changes I like

So I upgraded a virtual machine of mine to Windows 10 to v1709 [a.k.a. Fall Creator Update, Redstone 3] and there are 2 things that will appeal to some.

If you are upgrading from Microsoft’s Windows Update the first thing you will notice is that the amount of “bits” [files] that will be downloaded will be less than previously as the upgrade software downloads just what it needs.

More for the IT professional, if you are doing a free/clean installation of Windows 10 v1709, the media will contain literally all versions of Windows 10 except the Enterprise version. Of course when you install, your serial number you have must still match with the version you choose [although entering the serial number in the screen prior should bypass this screen and the choice of editions].

Win10_1709

[Note: In the above screen Windows 10 Pro and Windows 10 Pro N aren’t shown until you scroll down.]

 

 

Microsot Edge coming to iOS and Android smartphone

You read it right.

Microsoft announced that their Edge web browser would be coming to iOS and Android – phone only – not tablets for now. On iOS, Edge is based on the WebKit engine, and on Android, the Chromium browser project. Both will probably be released by year end

Windows 10 v1709 goes RTM

Overnight, Microsoft has signed off with the RTM [“Release to Manufacturing”] of Windows 10 v1709 [a.k.a. Redstone 3, Fall Creator Update].

The build is 16299.15.

The build will official start to be available to current and new users in 2 weeks [October 17th].

Like the previous releases, new systems and current Windows 10 systems that are highly compatible [i.e. almost surely to have a successful upgrade] will get first crack. Over the next while, older systems will be notified.

Of course, once available, you can always upgrade on your own.

For any reason you are at a version older than v1703, I would suggest skipping v1703 and installing v1709. If you never got notified, you may want to check the upgrade advisor when released. You may have hardware that may block you from getting further Windows 10 feature releases.

[Update 2017/10/05:] While it has gone RTMed, Microsoft is testing to verify Windows Update updates. So by October 17th, it should still be build 16299 but the sub-build [if I can call it that] will definitely increase as [for example] there will be an update for “Patch Tuesday” on the October 10th.

What’s removed from Windows 10 v1709

Microsoft [like other companies] like to play around and remove tools and features that they don’t think is used as much while add others.

When Windows 10 v1709 [a.k.a. “Redstone 3”, “Fall Creator Update”] is released very, very, very soon, it will also lose some tools or will  still be included but unlikely to be around by the next release scheduled in March 2018 [v1803].

Among the changes are:

  • 3D Builder app will no  longer be installed by default. Consider using Print 3D in its place. However, 3D Builder is still available for download from the Windows Store [a.k.a. Microsoft Store].
  • Microsoft Paint has been removed but will be available through the Windows Store [a.k.a. Microsoft Store]. Functionality has been integrated into Paint 3D. There was enough of a protest that Microsoft made it available.
  • Would you believe Outlook Express legacy code was removed.
  • PowerShell 2 will be deprecated. Version 5 is already in v1709. If still using 2, 5 has a lot more features and improvements. It should be gone by v1803.
  • There are numerous other changes, mostly “under the hood” – the typical user may not notice or care.

 

 

Microsoft announcements at Ignite 2017

Here’s a short list of software that well be release by the time the Ignite 2018 conference comes around next year:

  • The general availability of SQL Server 2017 was announced and is scheduled for release on October 2nd. Trial version, Express edition and others will be available on or after that date.
  • Office Server 2019 [including Office clients, Exchange, SharePoint and Skype for Business Server] will be released in the second half of 2018 [more likely in the fall around September when Windows 10 v1809 is expected to be released].
  • [Not announced officially yet] But not surprising, Windows 10 v1709 and Windows Server 2016 v1709 will be released this week.

You can still upgrade to Windows 10 for free

So we are roughly 28 months away from the end of support for Windows 7. If you didn’t upgrade to Windows 10, you still can.

As you probably remember [maybe unfortunately], Microsoft tried to shove Windows 10 down our throats initially with the “GWX” tool. Plenty of backlash there. But after the year was up, that tool disappeared and those with Windows 7 [or Windows 8.1] weren’t asked anymore.

Some refused Windows 10 for various reasons [I wonder how many actually used/tested it for decent amount of time or just took everyone’s negative opinions and that was it]. Some didn’t want to switch or had applications that wouldn’t work with Windows 10 [that I can understand].

So now, it has been a couple of years and time is ticking.

You can still “upgrade” [note the quotes] if you have a valid Windows 7 [or Windows 8.1] license.

To do this you will need to wipe your current Windows installation complete.

Verify you have access to your system’s serial number.

Download the Windows 10 installation ISO and transfer to a DVD or USB key and the media matches the version of your serial number. For example, if Windows 7 is a “Home Premium”, you need a copy of the “Home” media. If Windows 7 is “Pro” or “Ultimate” you will need the “Pro” media.

All license applications will need to be uninstalled [so you can use the same license in Windows 10].

You must back up all of your data.

Ideally if you had a second hard disk, you could install Windows 10 there and then transfer the data from the old hard disk to the new/spare hard disk [keeping the old hard disk as a backup for a while].

Once data is backed up and nothing else is needed on the old hard disk, boot off the USB key or DVD. When asked, do not keep anything. Wipe out the partitions [optionally wipe the OEM partition].

It will ask you if you want it to check for updates, that is questionable. See my notes below.

If asked for the version, match the Windows 7 version with the Windows 10 equivalent [see above]. When asked for a serial number, enter your Windows 7 license number.
Let the installation go through.

When done, clean up what you don’t need and modify whatever settings.

Restore your applications and data.

If not already done, check for updates.

Notes:

  • Unsure if this free upgrade option will continue on indefinitely.
  • Once you upgrade, the Windows 7 license is marked as invalid.
  • If you previously upgraded to Windows 10 and then downgraded to Windows 7, when asked to enter a license, don’t enter anything. Once you finish the installation, it should pull the Windows 10 license from a Microsoft server [assumed you didn’t make too many hardware changes]. But it is still good to jot down that serial number.
  • I always pause when it asks to check for updates before the installation. I find that it sometimes takes forever to find any updates. On the other hand, the latest update may correct any issues since Windows 10 release that could cause the installation to fail if the update isn’t installed.
  • I have done this once and it worked like a charm. Others on the internet have also done it. There is always that weird chance it won’t work. Don’t know what to tell you. Everything has a risk level. Every situation is different. I can’t be responsible for a failed upgrade.