Microsoft update KB4524244 pulled

In an ever growing list of Microsoft updates that have had problems with, add KB4524244 to the list.

The update was designed to address “an issue in which a third-party Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) boot manager might expose UEFI-enabled computers to a security vulnerability.”

The update has since caused freezing, booting and installation issues.

KB4524244 gives you ways of removing the update.

Have you upgraded to Windows 10 v1903 or v1909

Have you noticed any major [feature] update in the last little while? It is the one that can take 45+ minutes to do.

If not, you need to check to make sure you have either 1903 or 1909 installed on your Windows 10 computer. To do this:

  1. Open “Settings” or “PC Settings” [this will depends on what menu you see].
  2. Click on “System” [it’s always in the upper left corner of the 10+ icons in the window].
  3. On the left side scroll down and click on “About”.
  4. On the right side scroll down until you see “Windows specifications”.
  5. Ignoring the other details, you must see version 1903 or 1909.

If you are at 1809 or prior, it may be because your Anti-virus version may be too old/out-dated. Microsoft is stopping any Windows 10 computer from getting the latest version until the Anti-virus is updated correctly.

In addition, if you are at 1803 and before, you will not get any further updates to Windows [including the monthly ones] until you upgrade to 1903 or 1909.

You can run the Upgrade Assistant to check if you computer is compatible or to upgrade. There are some older processors which may have been compatible with older versions of Windows 10 but not the latest.

PS – 1903 and 1909 are almost identical. Either version is OK to be on.

Success! Upgraded to Windows 10 v1903

So a month or so ago I tried to upgrade to Windows 10 v1903 [19H1] from v1809.

If you remember [or not!] the history of my prime computer, I had tried to upgrade from v1709 to v1803 but it failed. Too many weird things such as certain options I could not change and I had issues with my audio card.

As I have Windows 10 Pro, I can delay these feature upgrades for up to a year – which I did. I skipped v1803 and upgraded from v1709 to v1809.

Over time, I also noticed that I was getting some issues with my sound card.

So after upgrading from v1809 to v1903 failed earlier this summer, I decided to “modernize” my sound card. It wasn’t the latest sound card but still newer than my old one – which was around 10 years old.

Yesterday, I upgraded to v1903 successfully. Seemed to take a bit longer than previously but I don’t see any issues. And for once, after upgrading, I didn’t have to spend time fixing the settings.

I tend to upgrade with the media, instead of waiting for Windows [or Microsoft] to notify me. So I go through the process of checking for updates and what to keep [among other stuff].

What I found interesting is that after it checked for updates, all it installed was the latest cumulative update for Windows 10 v1903.

What it didn’t include was a servicing stack update [KB4515530], a microcode update [KB4497165], and a .net Framework update [KB451155]. So why weren’t those included while checking for updates?

One reason why getting v1903 onto my system is that when v1909 [1`9H2] comes out at the end of this month or early next month [assuming no major issues again!]. v1909 will be not a feature update but a huge update [can you call it a service pack?] that will installed like a typical monthly update. But v1903 will be required for the v1909 update.

Note that Microsoft is expected to have a regular full installation for any system that isn’t at v1903 but want to go to v1909 directly.

Who needs privacy?

With the warnings about the FaceApp app, most people don’t seem to give a crap what any license agreement says. Do you ever read the license agreement or think about what permissions the app wants access to?

Nah! Just want to use the latest viral app.

How many people install an app one day and then forget about it by the following week [if not earlier]?

Some install it only because it went viral and can now boast it is on their phone.

For example, how many people will use the FaceApp on themselves and family and friends and then run out on who to use it on.

[While at it, now the developer has images of family and friends even though those family and friends didn’t give the FaceApp user permission to use their picture.]

No different from the people who post that they are now at the airport taking a flight somewhere and won’t be back home for a couple of weeks [i.e. I’m not home. Rob me!] Wants access to my contacts, photos, camera and documents even though it’s a “flashlight” app? No problem.

I don’t remember the which [business] application for Windows it was but there was one that left a message way down in the EULA [that’s End User License Agreement] that said if you are reading this call a toll free number for a prize/reward. After its release, it took 3 months for someone to call and 2 a few more months for the second and third person to call.

I wish people would take the extra 15-30 seconds and see what is being taken from you.

Microsoft to push Spring 2019 Windows 10 update

Because of the more than expected amount of Windows 10 users are still using the v1803 release [which will have support ending this fall], Microsoft has decided to push out the v1903 [the latest Windows 10 release] earlier than usual.

You will have the option to delay the v1903 upgrade release for up to 35 days so you can do the upgrade at your convenience. Depending on your computer, this upgrade could last from about an hour [for faster computers] to over 2 hours [for slower computers].

This needs to be done soon – otherwise you will not receive any further security updates and enhancements.

Warning about the FaceApp app for the iPhone

In case you didn’t hear there is a new iPhone app called FaceApp which allows it create a photo of what would you be like if you are older [I am guessing not many changes if you are quite old?].

But, according to the license agreement, by using the app, you give the developer full life-time rights to use the photos without your permission. It may also be able to post your photo to the internet including your user name and location) and could be visible for everyone to see.

FaceApp also collects information about browsing history and location.

The agreement claims “we will not rent or sell your information to third parties outside FaceApp” but will share information with “third-party advertising partners” to deliver targeted ads to users.

The same app was pulled in late 2017 because it allowed you to chance your race [i.e. black, Asian, Indian or white].

Note: There is a FaceApp for Androids but it seems to be different.

Microsoft change feature updates frequency for “home” Windows 10 users

Microsoft has announced changes to how Windows 10 get feature updates [that is/was the big one roughly every 6 months – assuming no issues]. For OEM and retail Windows 10 editions [think the “Home” version], feature update installations are no longer mandatory. Instead, the feature update is offered as an optional update. The PC’s owner has to approve of the installation manually. You’re free to ignore that prompt for as long as the current version is supported, or a maximum of 18 months.

For Pro, Education, and Enterprise editions, it is the status quo.