Turmoil hits FIFA

Turmoil hits FIFA, the world governing body of soccer, errr, football, in the world.

Just days after arrests from major officials in the organization, 4 time president of FIFA, Sepp Blatter, became a 5-time president. It wasn’t even close, winning in the second round.

The latest battering to FIFA’s credibility came when Swiss and U.S. criminal probes into corruption were disclosed two days before the presidential vote, with several leading officials arrested in Zurich.

Major [US] sponsors have already warned that they want to see corruption and reported near slave labor in Qatar [hosting the 2022 World Cup] cleaned up.

The 2018 World Cup was awarded to Russia and Russian President [and tyrant/dictator] Vladimir Putin was already blaming the US wondering why the US was also probing FIFA – thinking that the US is trying to remove Russia from hosting the world cup, just 3 years away. He has gone bonkers.

[Since the US doesn’t have clout in football and the rest of the world’s votes dwarf the US – even with allies – unsure how the US can get FIFA to remove Russia as host unless it is clear that Russia was heavily involved in corruption. But you know Putin. He comes out with these hypotheticals that are so unlikely.]

One of those officials that were arrested is from Russia.

Sepp Blatter has promised to clean up FIFA. If so, he didn’t notice all this corruption over the past few years as the probes have indicated the length of the investigation?

And what happens if it continues?

Oh both Russia and Qatar backed Blatter as president – which will run for the next four years. Blatter was supposed to leave his post in 2011 in a deal but reneged on the deal. Can he be trusted?

There have been some rumors the UEFA [the European governing body], US, Canada and South America could pull out of FIFA. What would this mean for FIFA?

Well, some of the major powerhouses – let alone most of the sponsors – would abandon the World Cup. The sponsors want to see the best teams play and not a bunch of previously ranked low ranked countries battle for the cup. The UEFA president asked Blatter to stand down but was refused.

I think FIFA needs UEFA more than UEFA needs FIFA.

A European boycott could also cause problems when it comes to having foreign players play in the various leagues across the Europe and elsewhere. Would the best players in Africa be able to play in European leagues?

Blatter has tried to defend himself and has hinted there is some type of political correlation in the investigation.

Meanwhile at least two banks that have dealt with FIFA have opened internal investigations to see if they are involved in the corruption.

[Oh the US can investigate FIFA, just like any other country as they are a member of FIFA. In addition, most of the major sponsors are from the US.]

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Here comes the second season

Ok. We are coming close to playoff season for hockey and basketball.

A few have commented on how many teams make the playoffs.

Over the years the National Hockey League had a problem because too many teams made the playoffs. Even with a very sub-par season was good enough for a team to make the playoffs – and in a few cases actually went farther than expected.

At least as the NHL reached 30 teams at least they didn’t increase the number of teams in the playoffs. Already it is too long at possibly 2 months’ worth of playoffs – considering the season is under seven months.

It all comes down to money. NHL players do not get a salary as the playoff season begins. So any sales from tickets [and maybe from other sources] are pure profit [well except for the obvious stuff]. On top of that, playoff tickets are usually quite higher than a regular season game.

The same could be said for some junior hockey leagues. One in particular has 18 teams and 16 make the playoffs.

Baseball could be another example. It used to be 2 teams in each league. Then with three divisions, it was the best three plus the best ream of the rest. Now there is a playoff game between the two top teams [other than the division winners].

Once again, what the owners reap in is almost pure profit as the biggest chunk of playing a game is the players’ salaries.

The National Football League – luckily – doesn’t have a very lengthy season. Well, not really, as there are plenty of teams. But they play a single game and not best of five or seven.