Who needs privacy?

With the warnings about the FaceApp app, most people don’t seem to give a crap what any license agreement says. Do you ever read the license agreement or think about what permissions the app wants access to?

Nah! Just want to use the latest viral app.

How many people install an app one day and then forget about it by the following week [if not earlier]?

Some install it only because it went viral and can now boast it is on their phone.

For example, how many people will use the FaceApp on themselves and family and friends and then run out on who to use it on.

[While at it, now the developer has images of family and friends even though those family and friends didn’t give the FaceApp user permission to use their picture.]

No different from the people who post that they are now at the airport taking a flight somewhere and won’t be back home for a couple of weeks [i.e. I’m not home. Rob me!] Wants access to my contacts, photos, camera and documents even though it’s a “flashlight” app? No problem.

I don’t remember the which [business] application for Windows it was but there was one that left a message way down in the EULA [that’s End User License Agreement] that said if you are reading this call a toll free number for a prize/reward. After its release, it took 3 months for someone to call and 2 a few more months for the second and third person to call.

I wish people would take the extra 15-30 seconds and see what is being taken from you.

Warning about the FaceApp app for the iPhone

In case you didn’t hear there is a new iPhone app called FaceApp which allows it create a photo of what would you be like if you are older [I am guessing not many changes if you are quite old?].

But, according to the license agreement, by using the app, you give the developer full life-time rights to use the photos without your permission. It may also be able to post your photo to the internet including your user name and location) and could be visible for everyone to see.

FaceApp also collects information about browsing history and location.

The agreement claims “we will not rent or sell your information to third parties outside FaceApp” but will share information with “third-party advertising partners” to deliver targeted ads to users.

The same app was pulled in late 2017 because it allowed you to chance your race [i.e. black, Asian, Indian or white].

Note: There is a FaceApp for Androids but it seems to be different.