Warning about a silent Windows 10 driver update

Over the last few days there has been a few cases where Windows 10 [I am guessing v1703 at the very least] has silently installed an update.

That update actually butchered [in these 3 cases that I know of] the video card drivers. Instead of 1920*1080, the highest display dropped to 1280*1024 as the video card wasn’t supported in Windows 10 but somehow, it did install some decent drivers originally.

If you have this problem, use the System Restore to go back to a date prior to the installation. Then apply the 6 steps at the bottom.

If System Restore doesn’t work, the follow these steps, rebooting at the end if needed:

  1. Go to Device Manager in the Control Panel.
  2. Select Display Adapter and then choose the display adapter shown.
  3. Right click and select Update drivers.
  4. Then Browse my computer for driver software and then Let me pick from a list of device drivers.
  5. Choose the drivers probably with a date from 2015 [may be just one].

If your computer is using old hardware, you may want to disable the option to let Windows automatically update hardware drivers.

To turn off Windows checking for hardware drivers via Windows Update:

  1. Go to Control Panel.
  2. Click System.
  3. Click Advanced system settings from the left sidebar.
  4. Select the Hardware tab.
  5. Press the Device Installation Settings button.
  6. Choose No, and then press the Save Changes button.

A negative issue turning this option off is that you will have to update drivers on your own and if you add any hardware, there may be some issues adding the hardware.

 

 

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Turn off the option to get driver updates from Windows Update

As you may know, sometimes drivers that may come through Windows Update may not be perfect [hummm]. Many experts prefer to update the drivers on their own. In Windows 10 you can turn off Windows Update from updating any drivers with is procedure:

  1. Navigate to Control Panel > System > Advanced system settings.
  2. Click the Hardware tab then click on Device Installation Settings.
  3. Select the No (your devices may not work as expected).
  4. Then select Save Changes.

Under Windows 7, you have further options if you choose No, let me choose what to do. You can choose always or never get driver updates from Windows Update or only get drivers if not on the computer.

 

Driving pet peeves

OK. Whether or not you drive, you have seen them. Idiots on the road.

Well, here is a bunch of pet peeves regarding these idiots who drive on our road [sometimes dangerously].

  • The drivers who wait until the last moment who want to make a right turn by trying to swing over from the left lane in a three lane road [or vice versa – swap left for right].
  • The drivers who don’t bother to use their signals until they are actually in the turning lane – they can only turn [legally]. Now exactly who is that helping?
  • The drivers who don’t bother to even use their signals when turning left [in a non-left turning only lane].
  • The drivers who decided to use their signals when turning left [in a non-left turning only lane] but at the last moment.
  • The drivers who think they are immune to accidents and tickets by yacking on the cell phone when driving regulations in the province or state have banned cell phone usage talking unless a hands-free device is used.
  • As a sub-pet peeve to above, maybe it hasn’t been banned but wearing headphones to listen to music isn’t smart either [hearing is needed also to drive]. Personally, even Blue-tooth ear devices aren’t that good either.
  • The drivers who walk around with a Bluetooth piece in their ear even when not in the car. Looks a bit ridiculous. Is it glued?
  • The taxi drivers who will do anything to get a customer/victim. From blocking multiple lanes in traffic [when there is a parking spot 20 feet away], to making a U-turn on a busy street, to driving recklessly just to get to that customer/victim, etc.
  • To the truck driver who decides to park on a busy street to make a delivery [when there is a parking spot 20 feet away].
  • The truck drivers [and some others] who like to be right behind your back bumper on a highway.
  • The dumb drivers [in sedans, SUVs, etc.] who are right behind a truck bumpers. The truck driver can’t see the car behind them. [In a side note: In a case like this, I saw a truck went over the stop line and decided to back up – not knowing there is a vehicle right behind his truck. The vehicle’s front end was crushed.]

If you got any to add, feel free to add them in the comment section below.

Wait before installing a new Windows OS

If you read my little issue with Windows 8 [see https://ebraiter.wordpress.com/2012/10/26/yes-i-did-install-windows-8-pro/], this is the reason why I tell people to wait a bit before installing a new Windows operating system.

I would normally have waited a while but I figured what could go wrong on a netbook? It doesn’t have much of the latest and greatest technologies with the exception of an Intel 330 series SSD [180GB].

I think part of the problem that made Windows Vista to be the black sheep of the recent Windows OSs [OK, Windows 8 could beat Windows Vista] was that Windows Vista was really a nearly complete reworking. As such, drivers had to be created or it. Even worse – limited 64-bit drivers and software.

So what did some people do? They bought Windows Vista, installed it on their primary system [upgraded or otherwise] and then found out that there were no drivers for the video card, audio card, etc. They then whined and complained.

[Of course there are other reasons why Windows Vista got a bad rap.]

For example, my desktop has a Creative Labs SoundBlaster X-Fi Titanium card. Have it since I built the system. So almost three years old and considered an “archived product”. Only bets drivers as yet. Good thing is that Creative Labs will support it [to some degree] for Windows 8 – but I would have to wait – if I installed Windows 8 on my desktop – but not at this time.

So this brings me to my regular solution: Check to see if drivers are available [built in or otherwise] for all components of your computer.