Some more information on what to expect with Windows 10

[The information below based on Insider Preview build 15042.]

As Microsoft works out the kinks in Windows 10 Creator Update [a.k.a. Redstone 2, a.k.a. v1704] in time for an expected April release [I am guessing somewhere around April 25th], Microsoft continues to test the Unified Update Platform [UUP].

UUP is similar to the windows update technology that is used for the current cumulative updates [where while the size of the update is (say) 1GB, it only download what it needs]. The same will apply for installing the Creator update from an earlier update. Instead of downloading 2.5GB to 3.5GB of binaries [many which haven’t changed since your current release], it will only download the installer portion plus what has changed. Microsoft estimates that it should be about one third of a full installation. So if you are updating a 64-bit Windows 10, it will need to grab maybe 1.2GB instead of 3.5GB.

Those who upgrade to the Creator Update get the technology immediately. Obviously if you buy a new computer with the Creator Update, it will be included for the next update [Redstone 3 or v1711].

Of course you can still download the ISO file to upgrade if you wish.

Microsoft has also made the Windows 10 installing experience a bit less business orientated and more casual. In addition to a voice guiding you through [which you can mute if you get annoyed], the way things are described on the screen are more like everyday usage.

Such as if you want to create a local account instead of a Microsoft account [which seems easier to find now], it asks you to “create a super memorable password” in big letters and a warning that there is no way to retrieve the password if lost [hah!].

Or during updates during the installation it will say “Don’t turn off your device, please! It will mess things up.”

Patch updating as changed. For “home” users, you can install and reboot right away, schedule a time within the next 3 days or snooze the alert for 3 days [you can’t snooze again]. Pro users as well as those on a domain will have other options. The “quiet” time for no updating has also increased from 12 hours to 18 hours.

Ed

PS – At this time, if you are running Windows 10 in VMware Workstation 11, it may crash after installing VMware Tools. So don’t. Windows 10 actually picks up sufficient drivers. The same for older version. No idea about VMware Workstation 12 or later.

 

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