Using digital signatures (part 1 of 2)

One interesting you can do in some applications is to add a digital signature so people know it is authentic.

Before you can use your encryption certificate in Windows you need to first request one. If you are using it strictly for personal reasons, you can request a free certificate at http://www.trustcenter.de/en/products/tc_internet_id.htm.

If you are using this for anything other than for personal usage [i.e. sending out invoices, web site usage, etc.], you will need to request an appropriate one at http://www.trustcenter.de/en/products/. They are not free.

Note: You may use other certificate authorities. TrustCenter is owned by Symantec.

Once you go through the procedure, TrustCenter will send you two Emails – one with a login ID and password and a second with a link where to log in. You then need to generate the key [this may take a minute].

If you imported thre certificate into Internet Explorer, you will need to export the certificate first. In Internet Options from the Tools menu, select the Content tab and click on the Certificates button.

Highlight the certificate and export [usually to My Documents and give it a name – I included the expiry date].

When ask, export the private key, use Personal Information Exchange with nothing checked off and supply the TrustCenter password.

Go to My Documents, and double click on the certificate and import it into Windows.

Provide the password used in the email from TrustCenter.

Clear the Enable Strong Private Key protection option.

Select the Mark this key as exportable option. This allows you to export the file back out of the Windows Certificate Store. Click the Next button.

Make sure the default option Automatically select the certificate store based on the type of certificate is selected and click the Next button.

The application displays a summary of the settings. Click the Finish button.

Warning: Keep the two Emails sent to you from TrustCenter [or your certificate authority]. The password and other information are needed.

In the second part [ https://ebraiter.wordpress.com/2013/03/14/using-digital-signatures-part-2-of-2/ ], I will show you how to insert them into Outlook and Acrobat.

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About ebraiter
computer guy

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